Format:   Course
Level:   Introductory
Duration:   30 mins
CPD Points:   0.5

Insurers and brokers operate under difficult conditions and face many challenges in a increasingly more onerous legislative environment.  In this short course we will take a brief look at the role players in the industry, TCF, binder regulations, FAIS, FICA and the SAIA Code of Conduct.

Format:   Course
Level:   Introductory
Duration:   45 mins
CPD Points:   0.5

Treating customers fairly (TCF) is at the heart of future supervision and regulation in South Africa.  Clients have now become a priority for everyone in the game and this means having structured TCF programs in place.  TCF applies across the entire business and ensures that the customer's rights are protected at all stages of engagement and that the customer is comfortable dealing with a financial service provider.

Format:   Course
Level:   Introductory
Duration:   45 mins
CPD Points:   0.5

In order to protect the consumer and our industry, amendments to binder regulations were implemented by the FSCA (the FSB at the time).  A binder agreement is an outsourcing agreement between an insurer and a third party, typically a broker, administrator or underwriter.  Changes introduced by the new binder regulations redefine relationships between industry stakeholders.

Format:   Course
Level:   Introductory
Duration:   1 hour
CPD Points:   1

The Financial Advisory and Intermediary Services Act regulates the activity of giving advice and providing a financial service.  FAIS has changed the financial services scene.  Intermediaries & FSPs have to comply with specific requirements and consumers now enjoy protection in their dealings with financial services providers.

Format:   Course
Level:   Introductory
Duration:   45 mins
CPD Points:   0.5

FICA (Financial Intelligence Centre Act) imposes specific responsibilities on financial institutions including the requirement to “Know Your Client” (KYC) by establishing and verifying the identity of all clients prior to establishing a business relationship or concluding a transaction.In addition, information should be updated on a regular basis to ensure client information remains accurate and up-to-date.

Format:   Course
Level:   Introductory
Duration:   1 hour
CPD Points:   1

The insurance industry took a long hard look at how things are done, how things have been done, and how things should be done.

The SAIA Code of Conduct sets out detailed and comprehensive guidelines to ensure transparent and ethical business practices for SAIA member companies and also their contracted associates.  The Code was drafted by SAIA as a mechanism through which self-regulation could effectively be implemented.

Format:   Course
Level:    Intermediate
Duration:   2 hours
CPD Points:   2

Insurers and brokers operate under difficult conditions and face many challenges in a increasingly more onerous legislative environment.  In this course we will take a look at the role players in the industry, TCF, binder regulations, FAIS, FICA and the SAIA Code of Conduct.

PRE-REGISTER: COMING DECEMBER 2019

Format:   Course
Level:   Advanced
Duration:   2 hours
CPD Points:   2

In law, the basic assumption is that damage, or harm, lies where it falls, that is, each person must bear the damage he suffers.  If someone drives his car negligently and collides with a wall, or clumsily drops and damages an expensive watch, he has, in principle, no legal grounds for compliant or to receive compensation from anyone else.  As an innocent third party, however, you would not be very happy if it happened to be your wall or your watch that was damaged by someone else.  In this case you would look for some kind of compensation.  The wrongdoer has an obligation to compensate for the damage you have suffered, and the person prejudiced a right to claim this compensation.

PRE-REGISTER: COMING 2019

Format:   Course
Level:    Intermediate
Duration:   1 hour
CPD Points:   1 

The RAF provides personal injury and, when applicable, death compensation to those injured in motor vehicle accidents, provided the accidents weren’t caused solely by them. The person responsible for the accident is also, in terms of the RAF legislation, indemnified against any claims for compensation for bodily injury (save for so-called “emotional shock” claims).